Rational Dress Society at SAIC

Rational Dress Society

Join the Rational Dress Society at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, April 4th, 2016.

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago
7th Floor, 36 S. Wabash, Chicago, IL
noon – 1pm

Rational Dress Society co-founders Abigail Glaum-Lathbury and Maura Brewer invite you to participate in a re-imagining of our collective relationship to dress. What if you never had to pick out an outfit again? What bonds might be formed between JUMPSUIT-wearing individuals?

The RDS is pleased to present JUMPSUIT, an ungendered, universal monogarment for everyday wear. This lecture will cover both the technical and conceptual parameters of the project, as well as the current economic conditions that JUMPSUIT hopes to address: the deregulation of the garment industry and the rise of fast fashion.

FAST FASHION

In 1985, 70% of American’s clothes were made in the United States, in the year 2015 that number has dropped to less than 5%. Rates of production in the fashion industry have increased exponentially; with the advent of fast-fashion purveyors like Zara, H&M and Forever 21 a garment can go from conceptualization to store shelves in a matter of weeks. These companies employ a model of planned obsolescence, in which (by their own admission) clothes are made to last no more than ten wash cycles, thereby insuring that consumers will keep apace with accelerated rates of production. We at the Rational Dress Society believe that the current system is unsustainable. JUMPSUIT offers a way out: an open source, ungendered monogarment to replace all clothes in perpetuity.

TECHNICAL PARAMETERS

The design for JUMPSUIT is based on an ungendered sizing system, in which patterns are not derived from the typical male/female two pattern standard, but are made up of six base patterns, each determined by a variable hip to shoulder ratio. The result is 120 sizes, accommodating a wide variety of body types. JUMPSUIT rejects the impossible standards of body type and size that govern the fashion industry, and therefore aims to create a garment that is radically inclusionary, fostering solidarity between wearers.